Brazil based volunteer organization Iko Proan is offering a volunteer sports program, to coach young boys at school for soccer. The projetct started in Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, and now will extend to foreign countries, like Tanzania, Uganda, Argentina.

In Brazil, for some children from a favela a dream becam true, when they finally made part of the national team. It is the dream of social mobility, that boys born in a Rio favela once can compete on a world cup. On the football field, erverybody has equal chances to win.

With the words of Afonso from London, a football coaching volunteer in Brazil:

"My favourite memories are the smiles on people’s faces when I bought football equipment and stationary with money raised by friends and work colleagues. I was able to raise £530 in two weeks and would highly recommend raising some money through a donation website, so you can go the extra mile with supporting the locals". – Afonso, Kingsto University, London

Find out more about Football Coaching Volunteering.

Published in Sport

The Brazil midfielder says he would be happy to take a pay cut at Camp Nou and wants his current club to be similarly allowing in negotiations

Paulinho has called on Guangzhou Evergrande Taobao to be flexible as he chases a move to Barcelona, claiming he would accept a pay cut to push through a transfer.

Published in Sport

Bahia's Lucas Fonseca was given his marching orders on Sunday after picking up a second yellow card for - unquestionably - the most spectacular dive ever seen on a football pitch. The Brazilian centre-back picked up his first booking in the 24th minute, but rather than keeping his head down for the reminder of the game, the Fonseca raked his studs down the thigh of Flamengo forward Paolo Guerrero while clearing the ball.

Published in Sport
Wednesday, 12 February 2014 00:00

2014 World Cup stadium workers threaten to strike

Demanding better working conditions

further delays for football

Workers at a World Cup stadium in the city of Manaus are threatening to go on strike to demand better conditions following a third recent construction-related death at the venue. A walkout could further delay the completion of the Arena da Amazonia just months before the start of football's showcase tournament.

Published in Tourism

How to lose the WorldChampionship Football and still            

win the Cup.

 

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"We lost the trophy, but Brazil won the World Cup," said Aloisio Mercadante, Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff's chief of staff, in a statement.

"Brazil showed that they know how to win, lose, host and celebrate peace with respect and a 'make yourself at home' atmosphere that won the world over."

According to government figures, 1 million foreign tourists visited Brazil during the month-long event, far exceeding its pre-Cup projection of 600,000 visitors coming to the country from abroad.

About 3 million Brazilians traveled around the country during the event, just short of the expected 3.1 million.

Additionally, according to the government, of the million foreign visitors, "95% of them said they intend to return."

"We were saying that we would host the World Cup of World Cups," said President Rousseff in a statement. "Indeed, we staged the World Cup of World Cups.

"We had one problem, our match against Germany. However ... we beat the pessimistic predictions and hosted the World Cup of World Cups with the immense and wonderful contribution of our people."

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The government's assessment of the World Cup's impact on travel was significantly more enthusiastic than a report last week in the Wall Street Journal that called the event "a bust for Brazil's domestic travel industry."

Citing figures from the Brazilian Airline Association, that story projected total air travel in Brazil falling 11% to 15% during the World Cup compared with the same period in 2013. The story blamed hiked-up prices and large crowds for scaring off domestic tourists.

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Economists who study the impact of large sporting and other events on local and national economies tend to be less sanguine than the governments that host them.

"Every time you get a World Cup tourist you get one less regular tourist," Dr. Andrew Zimbalist, a sports economist and economics professor at Smith College in Massachusetts, tells CNN.

"Generally speaking, the World Cup does not benefit the host's tourism industry."

Zimbalist says it's doubtful Brazil's international tourism profile will experience long-term positive impact as a result of the World Cup.

He points to heightened media coverage around the event that focused on "unsavory conditions" facing the country, such as violence, poverty, pollution and social unrest, as illustrated by public demonstrations against the huge amounts of public funds spent on new infrastructure.

Furthermore, he said, the World Cup won't provide sustained promotion for the smaller of the event's 12 host cities.

The Amazonas city of Manaus is an example.

Zimbalist cited public money spent on a stadium that will eventually become underutilized. Rather than inspire coverage of the beauty of the surrounding Amazon, media reports tended to focus on the new facility and the conflict that surrounded its construction.

"It's very hard to see how that's going to promote tourism in Manaus," says Zimbalist.

More where that came from

Turning mega-sporting events such as the World Cup and Olympics into proxy tourism campaigns remains an uncertain enterprise.

 

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Some cities continue to reap the benefits of hosting.

Barcelona has seen a tenfold increase in tourist numbers since it hosted the 1992 Summer Olympics.

Meanwhile, a decade after hosting the 2004 summer games, Olympic venues in Athens have become decaying ghost towns.

For now, it's unlikely there will be enough time to assess the long-term economic impact of the World Cup on Brazil's economy in advance of the country's next huge event -- the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

Published in Sport
Sunday, 06 July 2014 00:00

Work for Brazil

There's a spoof calendar doing the rounds in the Brazilian media.

It's particularly popular among online hacks who can't resist a dig at Brazil's many flaws and weaknesses.The calendar essentially highlights the three or, at a push, four months during the coming year that Brazil will be "open for business". After the usual extended summer holidays, we'll all be briefly back to work before clocking off again for Carnival.

Published in Business
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